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Thread: I have a Question

  1. #1
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    I have a Question

    I have a question for those who live north of me or in Canada. I have always wondered about this. I live in south central Oklahoma and about the coldest it ever gets here is maybe down in the teens at night but always warms up to atleast 30 degrees or so in the day time. Now I love to be outside working on the place or the farm. You people that live in Canada do yall get outside when it is like I saw a couple of weeks ago and negative 60 degrees. That is insane. I can't even imagine those tempatures. I freeze my tail end off when it is like 60 degrees above zero here. I was just wandering. thanks.

  2. #2
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    Re: I have a Question

    Rabbit fur underware and electric socks. Hot Eskimo chicks every 2 hours.
    2008 F-250 V-10 Loaded
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  3. #3
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    Re: I have a Question

    Now, I live in Michigan, not Canada, but in the winter (starting right about now) we routinely get temps in the low teens all day long, at least once or twice in the winter down to 0 deg F and I can remember a couple of times when it was well below zero (maybe -5 to -15).

    I don't feel it's cold until it's below 10, but the key is to dress warm with GOOD COLD WEATHER CLOTHING. I've got gloves that my hands feel warm no matter how cold it gets. (they're ski gloves that cost $110/pair) I've skied in Colorado in 0 degree weather. I.e. outside for several hours at a time.

    I think at negative 40 or so, your skin will freeze in a few seconds, so the key is to wear face masks and toques (sic?).

    Minus 60, I think you're just going outside if you ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO. Not much you can do out there anyway at those temps.

    On the bright side, coming in from skiing or shoveling snow or whatever and sitting in front of a warm fire with a cup of something hot puts a smile on your face. [img]/forums/images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    BTW, temps are relative. I've been in Florida when it was 60 and felt like I was freezing my @ss off. [img]/forums/images/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

  4. #4
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    Re: I have a Question

    My parents lived in Texas and Oklahoma most of their lives (short time in Baltimore in 1941-42) and my dad hated the cold weather; always said he didn't mind the heat in the summer and never had air-conditioning at home or work, except for an evaporative cooler (swamp cooler) in a living room window.

    Then they moved to Anchorage, AK, in October, 1965, lived there for 6 years until he retired, then still went back every summer for several years. And they both loved Alaska and never complained about the cold. I couldn't believe it when my dad mentioned spending the night in a tent at 26 degrees below zero, and mother said the social activities kept going in the winter in spite of cold and snow.

    My two brothers lived in Alaska 20 and 25 years, hunted, fished, raced snowmobiles, etc. and liked it. But now they wear long underwear to play golf in Texas and can't stand the cold. [img]/forums/images/icons/confused.gif[/img]

    As others have said, you get acclimated to it, and you dress for it, and it's no problem within reason, but of course, it does sometimes get too cold to do anything that you don't absolutely have to do. [img]/forums/images/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

  5. #5
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    Re: I have a Question

    Jerry, I survived Arctic Survival training and three consecutive winters in Minot, ND where it got colder than -40F every winter. The coldest I was out in for any time was -47. Temperature, wind, and humidity combine to give you the chill factor or equivalent dry and still air equivalent temperature.

    Our on-base (SAC/USAF) weather service provided a telephone number for getting a weather report. They did not report the traditional chill factor as mentioned above but instead reported the time it would take, on average, for exposed flesh to freeze. They would report that down to 10 seconds and then just say the chill factor is less than 10 seconds. Whenever the chill factor got down so low as to freeze exposed flesh quickly enough they would warn you to not let dependents (wives and children) go outside. If conditions were really bad then non-essential personnel were excused from duty.

    For the most part I was able to avoid exposing flesh in those conditions. I did walk to the chow hall one cold, windy, and snowy morning and after breakfast walked to work (easier to walk that to hassle with a car in these conditions.) I was the only one there. My reward for braving the conditions was a phone call telling me I was not supposed to be there and to go back. Unfortunately it was into the wind all the way back and much less pleasant. I was wearing long johns, two sets of fatigue pants, 2 pair of socks, boots, and my arctic flying jacket with a hood fringed in wolverine fur. Pretty miserable conditions.

    The hardy locals, folks with dairy farms and other stock, had to contend with some really poor conditions. Bunches of the wheat farmers head south to Arizona and such and don't go back to NODAK till the ground is warmed up enough to plow.

    I notice you are in the Purcell area. A couple winters ago we experienced a night of 8 degree temps and the next night it was zero or a tad below. My water meter froze up and had to be thawed with a torch. A section of pex froze up under one of the kitchen sinks where the plumbers and insulators messed up and got the insulation on the wrong side of the pipe and the pipe against the outside of the wall cavity. I am almost 25 miles east of the Green Street intersection stop light next to the Carl's Jr. there in Purcell. I don't know why your temps would be so much warmer than ours, just lucky I guess.

    The rural water district didn't bury the meter box as deeply as it was supposed to be so I put insulation inside and added dirt around it to earth berm it for protection against a repeat performance. Who knows, maybe we will have a winter yet. A week or so back I noticed trees in the Purcell area budding out after one of our 70 degree periods.

    Pat
    "I'm not from your planet, monkey boy!"

  6. #6
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    Re: I have a Question

    The sad truth is, millions of people who live north of the Mason-Dixon line die each year from the cold. This does not make it to the news because many of those dead were reporters.


  7. #7
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    Re: I have a Question

    most of the reporters were brain dead when they went outside to begin with. [img]/forums/images/icons/grin.gif[/img]

  8. #8
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    Re: I have a Question

    When I worked on the Alaska Pipeline Project in the winter of 1974-75, we had minus 72 one night and averaged minus 60 for almost a week. Our camp at Coldfoot/Wiseman had numerous frostbite cases, mostly of the "private" nature when taking a leak outside. When they "wagged their Willie", one had to be very quick and careful.
    2008 F-250 V-10 Loaded
    2007 Lincoln LT grocery getter
    2007 Kubota RTV 900
    1996 Ford Bronco


  9. #9
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    Re: I have a Question

    At Minot Air Force Base, every winter there would be a rash of frost bite cases involving the upper chest/lower neck and cases of people getting stuck to their car door handle or to a metal trash can lid's handle.

    Sarge is veging out on the couch in front of the tube and his wife makes him put out the trash. He isn't going to miss any more of the game than absolutely necessary so he dashes out on the back porch, grabs the trash can lid (to which his hand sticks and over time thaws out from body heat and lets him go) and by the time he gets back inside the house he has frost bitten his lower neck where his "V" necked T shirt exposes tender flesh.

    Alternatively, Sarge wears his summer weight dress uniform to work (sans long johns) but is comfortable since his car was garaged and he had a heater in it using FREE Gov electricity. He only has to go a few steps from his parking spot to the bld where his office is located. His car sits out there all day and gets really cold so when he dashes out to leave at 5:00 PM with no gloves on his hand sticks to the metal door handle. He gets excited and breathes too much. By the time he gets loose of the handle to go back inside to warm up he has frostbitten his lungs and starts to froth at the mouth with pink foam shortly prior to collapsing, falling to the floor and being declared dead on arrival after the base ambulance comes for him.

    I'm sure Pappy "gets it" with respect to cold weather survival strategies.


    I do find it interesting that the OP (in Purcell, OK) has such moderate temps while I have days in the teens and twenties and nightsa as cold as 12F, so far. Of course the cold has been interspersed with warm (60's-70's) weather too.

    I was warm for a while today, while fighting a wild fire with 20 MPH winds. Our neighbor across the highway is a volunteer fireman and was on the case along with many others from two different towns, aboiit 5 trucks in total. Seems the neighbors son and his nephew were playing with fireworks and started a fire. It was very dry and windy today, a RED FLAG ALERT, not a good time to do fireworks. The fire jumped the highway and got an acre or two of mine and part of an adjacent neighbor's lawn.

    Pat
    "I'm not from your planet, monkey boy!"

  10. #10
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    Re: I have a Question

    Coldest I've experienced is mid -40's. As long as you dress properly and you are healthy it is really not bad. We snowmobile getting up to 70+mph when it is below -40 and with the wind chill temp the combination has to be -50 or more but you don't even feel it if you are properly dressed. That said, I would not want to live where it is that cold for extended times such as in the far north.

    Heck, when we were in our 20's we used to winter camp in the woods when it was regularly -40. Double up 2 high quality sleeping bags and you are toasty all night. Getting up in the morning was a bit of a drag though! [img]/forums/images/icons/grin.gif[/img]

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